I'm raising my score SUPERFAST!!

Answers to:

TestMagic TOEFL Structure Based on the Vocab in Listening, Part C, Questions 39 to 43

 

  • In some of the explanations, you will see some extra questions or explanations. This is because we have included the questions that our students have asked since many people have the same questions.

  • Want to take more tests? Click here.

 


 

Answer

Correction/Explanation

  1. C

simple sentence: roofs were in use

correction: readily

  1. B

simple sentence: reeds and straw were among materials

We have inversion of the subject and verb here because the sentence starts with a prepositional phrase of location

  1. B

simple sentence: materials were in use

correction: later

We have inversion of the subject and verb here because the sentence starts with a prepositional phrase of location.

We have two prepositions here, after and in; using two prepositions together is usually incorrect in English, although it is not impossible.

  1. D

simple sentence: settlers chose to use reeds and straw

We can use the infinitive of purpose here. This one is a little bit confusing because we are using roof as a verb.

  1. A

simple sentence: reeds are plants

correction: plants

S: What about basket making? Shouldn’t it be plural since instruments is plural?

T: No, basket making is correct because basket making is a non-count noun and it can never be plural.

S: I’m still confused.

T: Okay, no problem. How about this sentence—is it correct? I like to have cookies and milk sometimes in the afternoon.

S: Yes.

T: Well, we have the same situation: plural count noun and singular non-count noun.

S: Is basket making a skill?

T: Kind of. It’s a hobby or activity.

  1. D

simple sentence: shingles are tiles

correction: are seen

  1. B

simple sentence: slate is used

correction: a smooth

surface is a singular count noun with no determiner; therefore, it is wrong, wrong, wrong.

  1. D

simple sentence: reeds and straw are able to endure winds

  1. B

simple sentence: barns are structures

We have a reduced adjective clause here. The original clause would be:  structures that are erected for….

Also, we need the –ed form since barns are receiving the action.

  1. A

simple sentence: barns have been subject

We have a reduced adjective clause here. The original clause would be:  Barns, which are often painted red, have….

  1. C

simple sentence: shingles are prohibited

We need to make the sentence from the clause:

What’s the head noun? ease

What’s the adjective clause?

which they can catch fire

How can we add the head to the clause?

We have to use a preposition, like this:

they can catch fire with ease

  1. D

simple sentence: it is bundled

correction: transported

  1. B

simple sentence: function is to provide

We need to use the infinitive with function, job, task, etc.

  1. A

simple sentence: one is longevity

correction: reasons

  1. C

simple sentence: shingles are popular

correction: are

We have subject/verb inversion here because we are using more… than… inversion.

S: What does those replace?

T: shingles.

S: What does flame retardant mean?

T: That means that the shingles “keep the flames away.”

S: So it’s harder for the shingles to catch fire?

T: You got it!

  1. B

simple sentence: hay is processed

correction: grasses as

S: Can grasses be a count noun?

T: Yes. Remember, it’s very easy for many words that we think are non-count nouns to become count nouns.

S: Can you tell me some more examples?

T: Sure, by all means: waters, acids, sugars, salts, oils, wines, etc.

S: What does fodder mean?

T: “Horse and cow food.”

  1. A

simple sentence: thatching is method

S: Would it be correct if I said that was widely used?

T: It sure would be correct!

  1. C

simple sentence: thatching was among methods

We have inversion of the subject and verb here because the sentence starts with an adverbial phrase.

  1. C

simple sentence: colonists did begin to use shingles

We have inversion of the subject and verb here because the sentence starts with a neg intro form.

  1. A

simple sentence: practice died out

We need to use the simple past here because we are talking about colonial Americans.

 

 

 

 

Want to take another test? Click here.