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Virtual TOEFL from TestMagic: Reading/Structure #01

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Instructions

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This exercise is an example of materials that are used in class at TestMagic. We create our own materials to best prepare students for the computer test.

When you do these exercises, you have two choices: you can do the whole exercise to build up your vocabulary, or you can go directly to the TOEFL questions if you want to simulate taking the real TOEFL.

Please write your answers on a separate sheet of paper. You cannot click on the answer choices. You will see time limits for each section. The total time for the simulated TOEFL questions is 30 minutes.

START

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Vocabulary

Time: no time limit

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New Word

What part of speech?

Can you think of a related word?

What do you think this word means?

New example

1.      

anniversary

 

 

 

The couple, married in the 1950’s, just celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.

2.      

isolated

 

------

 

Hawaii is an isolated island, remote from the U.S. mainland.

3.      

alliance

 

 

 

The two countries formed an alliance to defeat their common enemy.

4.      

donate

 

 

 

People are encouraged to donate blood as often as they can.

5.      

enlighten

 

 

 

The purpose of a school is not only to prepare you for a job, but to enlighten your mind as well.

6.      

dismantle

 

------

 

An expert mechanic can dismantle an automobile engine in just a few hours.

7.      

pedestal

 

 

 

Artworks are usually mounted on a pedestal so they are easier to see.

8.      

architect

 

 

 

The most famous American architect is Frank Lloyd Wright.

9.      

harsh

 

------

 

A fifty year prison sentence for jaywalking would be very harsh.

10.   

renovate

 

 

 

Renovating old abandoned buildings in large cities is very profitable.

11.   

spectacular

 

 

 

The view from Mt. Everest is quite spectacular.

12.   

dedicate

 

------

 

The doctor dedicated his life to finding a cure for heart disease.

13.   

vibrant

 

 

 

Vincent Van Gogh was well known for his vibrant use of colors.

14.   

inspire

 

 

 

Shakespearean plays have inspired dozens of movie adaptations.

15.   

massive

 

 

 

Modern battleships are so massive that they cannot enter most harbors.

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Grammar and Vocabulary Practice

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These are simulated TOEFL questions based on the reading that you will be doing later on in the lesson.

Time: 6 minutes

1. Thomas Jefferson and John Adams ------ died on July 4, the anniversary of the Declaration of Independence.

O they were both
O both
O they are both
O both are

2. The architecture of the ancient Greeks inspired the creation of the most greatest buildings of the Renaissance era.

3. During the years of alliance between George Lucas and Steven Spielberg ------ any better movie making team in Hollywood.

O there was hardly
O hardly was
O hardly were there
O when there hardly were

4. The vibrant colors of the Northern Lights are considering to be one of the most spectacular sights in nature.

5. Often ------ their books to family members or close friends.

O authors dedicate
O authors dedicated
O the dedication of authors
O dedicating authors

6. The gravity pull of planets, moons, and other massive body all affect the orbit of Earth as it circles the sun.

7. ------ undocumented donations allowed in an American political campaign.

O Why no
O Not only
O No
O There are no

8. It is not known for sure what type of pedestal the Colossus of Rhodes was placed upon since the structure is completely destroyed by invaders more than two thousand years ago.

9. The predecessor to the United Nations, the League of Nations was dismantle after several years of unsuccessful operation.

10. ------ incidents of Ebola virus outbreaks have been isolated incidents.

O The most
O Mostly
O Most
O Most of

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1 In 1877, to celebrate the centennial anniversary of America’s independence from England, the French government presented the United States with a colossal statue that has come to be one of the most beloved symbols of America. The gift was presented in honor of the alliance between France and America during the Revolutionary War. The formal name of the figure is Liberty Enlightening the World, but it is almost universally known as the Statue of Liberty.

2 Since the French government donated the money for the project, French sculptor Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi and engineer Gustav Eiffel were put in charge of the design. The massive structure was assembled in Paris, where it was put on exhibition before being dismantled, then shipped to New York and finally reassembled on Bedloe Island, which was later renamed Liberty Island.

3 The statue is made of thin copper sheets, each just a tenth of an inch thick. They are riveted to an iron framework, which forms the shape of the statue. The statue itself is 151 feet tall, but it stands on top of a large pedestal made of concrete and granite, which was designed by American architect Richard Morris Hunt. The total height of the statue and the pedestal is 305 feet, making it a spectacular sight on the New York City skyline, visible from miles away. The statue holds a torch in one hand, which is meant to symbolize liberty. In the other hand, the figure clutches a book, upon which the date of America’s declaration of independence, July 4, 1776, is marked.

4 Due to the difficulty and expense of working on an isolated island, construction took nearly a decade. After the statue was completed in 1886, President Grover Cleveland came to New York to preside over the dedication ceremony. After the unveiling, the Statue of Liberty became a beacon of freedom for both newly arriving immigrants and longtime city dwellers. But after decades of exposure to pollution and harsh ocean air, time had taken its toll on Lady Liberty, as the statue is sometimes called. A full century after the dedication, a restoration effort was launched to repair damage from age and the elements. Funded by both the French and American governments, the renovation of the statue required enclosing it in a scaffold while workers renovated the copper sheeting and replaced the glass torch with a gold one. The newly restored monument was unveiled a few years later, as vibrant and inspiring as ever.

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Time: 14 minutes

11. Which two countries formed an alliance during the Revolutionary War?

O France and Britain
O Britain and the United States
O France and the United States
O Britain and New York

12. Why were French artists responsible for designing the monument?

O because the French are the best artists
O because the French were funding the project
O because America did not want the monument
O because France owed money to the American government

13. Look at the word they in paragraph 3. What word does they refer to?

The statue is made of thin copper sheets, each just a tenth of an inch thick. They are riveted to an iron framework, which forms the shape of the statue. The statue itself is 151 feet tall, but it stands on top of a large pedestal made of concrete and granite, which was designed by American architect Richard Morris Hunt. The total height of the statue and the pedestal is 305 feet, making it a spectacular sight on the New York City skyline, visible from miles away.

14. Look at the word it in paragraph 3. What word does it refer to?

The statue is made of thin copper sheets, each just a tenth of an inch thick. They are riveted to an iron framework, which forms the shape of the statue. The statue itself is 151 feet tall, but it stands on top of a large pedestal made of concrete and granite, which was designed by American architect Richard Morris Hunt. The total height of the statue and the pedestal is 305 feet, making it a spectacular sight on the New York City skyline, visible from miles away. The statue holds a torch in one hand, which is meant to symbolize liberty. In the other hand, the figure clutches a book, upon which the date of America’s declaration of independence, July 4, 1776, is marked.

15. Look at the word clutches in paragraph 3. What word is closest in meaning to clutches in paragraph 3?

The statue is made of thin copper sheets, each just a tenth of an inch thick. They are riveted to an iron framework, which forms the shape of the statue. The statue itself is 151 feet tall, but it stands on top of a large pedestal made of concrete and granite, which was designed by American architect Richard Morris Hunt. The total height of the statue and the pedestal is 305 feet, making it a spectacular sight on the New York City skyline, visible for miles around. The statue holds a torch in one hand, which is meant to symbolize liberty. In the other hand, the figure clutches a book, upon which the date of America’s independence, July 4, 1776, is marked.

16. Look at the word one in paragraph 4. What does one refer to?

After the unveiling, the Statue of Liberty became a beacon of freedom for both newly arriving immigrants and longtime city dwellers. But after decades of exposure to pollution and harsh ocean air, time had taken its toll on Lady Liberty, as the statue is sometimes called. A full century after the dedication, a restoration effort was launched to repair damage from age and the elements. Funded by both the French and American governments the renovation of the statue required enclosing it in a scaffold while workers renovated the copper sheeting and replaced the glass torch with a gold one.

17. Look at the word approximately in paragraph 4. What word or phrase is closest in meaning to approximately?

Due to the difficulty and expense of working on an isolated island, construction took nearly a decade. After it was completed in 1886, President Grover Cleveland came to New York to preside over the dedication ceremony. Several years later, Bedloe Island and nearby Ellis Island became part of a processing center for European Immigrants coming to New York. During the sixty years that the Ellis Island complex was open, it welcomed approximately sixteen million people entering America. The site is now the Ellis Island Immigration Museum, and it hosts roughly a million visitors every year.

18. Where was the statue first assembled?

O Bedloe Island
O Liberty Island
O New York
O Paris

19. Click on the paragraph that explains how the Statue of Liberty suffered damage.

O Paragraph 1
O Paragraph 2
O Paragraph 3
O Paragraph 4

20. It can be inferred that the restoration process began in

O 1776
O 1876
O 1886
O 1986

21. The following sentence can be inserted into paragraph 4. Click on the square to insert the sentence.

The copper sheeting of the statue is highly reactive with carbon dioxide from car exhaust and with salty air from the New York Bay.

1 Due to the difficulty and expense of working on an isolated island, construction took nearly a decade.  2 After the statue was completed in 1886, President Grover Cleveland came to New York to preside over the dedication ceremony. 3 After the unveiling, the Statue of Liberty became a beacon of freedom for both newly arriving immigrants and longtime city dwellers. 4 But after decades of exposure to pollution and harsh ocean air, time had taken its toll on Lady Liberty, as the statue is sometimes called. 5 A full century after the dedication, a restoration effort was launched to repair damage from age and the elements. 6 Funded by both the French and American governments, the renovation of the statue required enclosing it in a scaffold while workers renovated the copper sheeting and replaced the glass torch with a gold one. 7

22. The following sentence can be inserted into paragraph 4. Click on the square to insert the sentence.

All of the building materials surrounding the monument detracted greatly from its beauty, but they were necessary to preserve the statue.

1 After the unveiling, the Statue of Liberty became a beacon of freedom for both newly arriving immigrants and longtime city dwellers. 2 But after decades of exposure to pollution and harsh ocean air, time had taken its toll on Lady Liberty, as the statue is sometimes called. 3 A full century after the dedication, a restoration effort was launched to repair damage from age and the elements. 4 Funded by both the French and American governments, the renovation of the statue required enclosing it in a scaffold while workers renovated the copper sheeting and replaced the glass torch with a gold one. 5 The newly restored monument was unveiled a few years later, as vibrant and inspiring as ever. 6

23. Which of the following is NOT a name by which the monument is called?

O Lady Liberty
O Statue of Liberty
O Liberty Island
O Liberty Enlightening the World

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Structure Practice

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These questions are designed by TestMagic to be difficult--we focus on the most common mistakes that our students make.

You will also notice that these questions come from the reading section--we want you to reinforce your vocabulary while you are doing TOEFL Structure questions.

Time: 10 minutes

24. In 1877, to celebrate the centennial anniversary of America’s independence from England, the French government presented the United States ------ colossal statue that has come to be one of the most beloved symbols of America.

O to
O it was a
O to the
O with a

25. Gift was presented in honor of the alliance between France and America during the Revolutionary War.

26. The formal name of the figure is Liberty Enlightening the World, but it is almost universally known by the Statue of Liberty.

27. Since the French government donated the money for the project, French sculptor Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi and engineer Gustav Eiffel were put ------ the design.

O in charge
O charging
O in charge of
O to charge

28. The massive structure was assembled in Paris, where it was put on exhibition before being dismantled, then shipped to New York ------ on Bedloe Island, which was later renamed Liberty Island.

O which assembled
O and finally reassembled
O to finally assemble
O which was assembled

29. Statue is made of thin copper sheets, each just a tenth of an inch thick.

30. The copper sheets are riveted to an iron framework, ------ the shape of the statue.

O to forming
O forms
O forming
O which form

31. The statue itself is 151 feet tall, but it stands on top of large pedestal made of concrete and granite.

32. Total height of the statue and the pedestal is 305 feet, making it a spectacular sight on the New York City skyline, visible from miles away.

33. The statue holds torch in one hand, which is meant to symbolize liberty.

34. In the other hand, the figure clutches a book, ------ the date of America’s declaration of independence, July 4, 1776, is marked.

O which
O which is
O upon which
O being

35. ------ the difficulty and expense of working on an isolated island, construction took nearly a decade.

O Due to
O Because
O Despite
O Although

36. After it was completed in 1886, President Grover Cleveland came to New York to preside over dedication ceremony.

37. After the unveiling, the Statue of Liberty became beacon of freedom for both newly arriving immigrants and longtime city dwellers.

38. A full century after the dedication, restoration effort was launched to repair damage from age and the elements.

39. ------ both the French and American governments, the renovation of the statue required enclosing it in a scaffold while workers renovated the copper sheeting and replaced the glass torch with a gold one.

O Funding by
O To fund it
O Funded by
O Because of funding

40. Newly restored monument was unveiled a few years later, as vibrant and inspiring as ever.

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END

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